Photo Set

chaplinfortheages:

thistorchthatifound:

The Circus (1928)

This scene in the film is amusing, the clowns he is watching are pathetically unfunny but “the tramp” finds them hysterical. To the displeasure of the Circus Proprietor.  He was played by Allan Garcia who was the snobbish butler in “City Lights” & the factory boss in “Modern Times”.

Source: thistorchthatifound
Photo
Charlie Chaplin is considered by many to be one of, if not the, greatest filmmaker of our time. A visionary from the early 20th century when the medium of the cinema was just hiking up its skirts and starting to move; Chaplin pioneered many techniques, sight gags, and methods that can be seen throughout the silent film era. Chaplin’s character, the  mischievous and oblivious Tramp, gets into all sorts of messes throughout Chaplin’s career, one of the most hilarious situations being in Charlie Chaplin’s 1928 production The Circus.
The Circus begins with The Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) wandering about the food vendors of a circus, disheveled an hungry, and soon getting on the wrong side of the policemen, instigating a hilarious slapstick chase sequence that hails back to other Chaplin films. The chase leads him into the ring of the actual circus, where he unintentionally becomes the star of the show, causing uproarious laughter from the crowd, leading the Ringmaster (Al Ernest Garcia) to offer Chaplin a job as a clown. Chaplin meets the Ringmaster’s beautiful daughter (Merna Kennedy), falls in love, and the real fun of The Circus begins!
Charlie Chaplin was a textbook perfectionist; writing, producing, directing, and starring in his own movies. And The Circus has the distinction of going a step further, Chaplin having composed a brand new score for it in 1967 to replace Hanns Eisler’s Septet no. 2 that scored the film when it was first released. Another more saddening note rings for The Circus, as many regard it to be the final film of the true Silent Film era, with The Jazz Singer, the first ‘talkie’ picture, having been released mere months earlier.
The Circus is one of Chaplin’s greatest films, and a fantastic show for an audience of all ages, races, and creeds. The Tramp’s struggle against adversity and search for happiness (and a full stomach) resonates with all audiences. And The Circus's surprisingly poignant ending just furthers the pathos of Chaplin's story, ringing true with all who witness it.

Charlie Chaplin is considered by many to be one of, if not the, greatest filmmaker of our time. A visionary from the early 20th century when the medium of the cinema was just hiking up its skirts and starting to move; Chaplin pioneered many techniques, sight gags, and methods that can be seen throughout the silent film era. Chaplin’s character, the  mischievous and oblivious Tramp, gets into all sorts of messes throughout Chaplin’s career, one of the most hilarious situations being in Charlie Chaplin’s 1928 production The Circus.

The Circus begins with The Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) wandering about the food vendors of a circus, disheveled an hungry, and soon getting on the wrong side of the policemen, instigating a hilarious slapstick chase sequence that hails back to other Chaplin films. The chase leads him into the ring of the actual circus, where he unintentionally becomes the star of the show, causing uproarious laughter from the crowd, leading the Ringmaster (Al Ernest Garcia) to offer Chaplin a job as a clown. Chaplin meets the Ringmaster’s beautiful daughter (Merna Kennedy), falls in love, and the real fun of The Circus begins!

Charlie Chaplin was a textbook perfectionist; writing, producing, directing, and starring in his own movies. And The Circus has the distinction of going a step further, Chaplin having composed a brand new score for it in 1967 to replace Hanns Eisler’s Septet no. 2 that scored the film when it was first released. Another more saddening note rings for The Circus, as many regard it to be the final film of the true Silent Film era, with The Jazz Singer, the first ‘talkie’ picture, having been released mere months earlier.

The Circus is one of Chaplin’s greatest films, and a fantastic show for an audience of all ages, races, and creeds. The Tramp’s struggle against adversity and search for happiness (and a full stomach) resonates with all audiences. And The Circus's surprisingly poignant ending just furthers the pathos of Chaplin's story, ringing true with all who witness it.

Photo
reels-and-cartridges:

            The year is 1925. The illegal booze flows like water, and the parties twirl like a kaleidoscope of aristocratic color. The stock market is doing nothing but climbing, and the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer. In this year in the United States of America a thin novel was published. A novel packed with power and symbolism and meaning and lessons and the American Dream. That novel was The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby is a novel dealing with the lofty height that is the American Dream and the corruption of wealth and prestige. This book, even today, is an applicable and relevant cultural icon of American literature that has been adapted to film on several occasions. And on May 10th at 12:00 AM, another iteration was added to that list.
            Baz Luhrmann is known for producing/directing films including Moulin Rouge and Romeo + Juliet. In only 4 feature length films, Luhrmann became known for a bizarre filming style that broke the rigid traditions of the Hollywood Cameraman. And his 5th full length film does NOT disappoint. Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby is the first reproduction for the silver screen since the famous 1974 film starring Sam Waterson. Luhrmann’s style can be described only as crazy, chintzy, glitzy, and bizarre. Yet… utterly perfect. To style it after the book and stay true to the feel and viewpoint Luhrmann keeps the concept of a third person/past-tense narration. However, while this risky gamble has ruined many a movie, several have actually pulled it off (Here’s lookin’ at you Princess Bride) The Great Gatsby managed to become one of those lucky few due to a clever, and subtle prologue. Probably the filming technique that many will find most jarring is the use of words actually appearing onscreen as spoken by the narrator. These techniques may sound odd, but they coalesce together in a production that gives The Great Gatsby a feel of a fairy tale, and after seeing this movie, I began to wonder if that isn’t what style the novel itself was meant to be all along. The soundtrack of The Great Gatsby, despite the Jazz Age being in full swing (see what I did there?? Swing is also a form of music that came about in the twenties and… okay, I’ll shut up) the majority of the music were popular modern songs by singers such as Beyonce and Carly Rae Jepsen. While I was slightly disappointed in the lack of big band jazz and swing, the slower, jazzier renditions of these popular songs even had me enraptured, tapping my fingers in time with the beat, and will help bring Fitzgerald’s world to modern audiences.
            The plot of the movie is more faithful to the book than almost any book-to-movie production I have ever seen. Minus a few small plot arcs, and the edition of a sort of tie-together prologue and epilogue, The Great Gatsby stays remarkably true to its printed parent. Taking place in the 20’s in The Big Apple, our story is narrated by Nick Carraway, a young mid-western Yale graduate who moves to New York to join the Bonds business in the biggest economic boom in the USA’s history. He moves into a forgotten groundskeeper’s cottage next to the property of a wealthy, and mysterious socialite named Jay Gatsby. As Nick observes the ethical and moral plights of his cousin Daisy and her husband Tom Buchanan, and the pro golfer Miss Jordan Baker, Nick finds himself embroiled in a confounding web of secrecy, love, deceit, and tragedy.              The casting for this Jazz Age saga was in most ways perfect. Even the smallest of supporting roles was cast in a way that made it stand out all on its own. The narrator, Nick Carraway, is portrayed by Tobey Maguire, also known as your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man (prior to Andrew Garfield). I’ll be honest, in many previous productions, I found Tobey’s performances lacking or out of place. However, I feel he really came alive as Nick Carraway, bringing a new depth to the quiet and subtle character. Daisy Buchanan,  from the moment she peeked over the couch in the room billowing with white curtains, held me enraptured with her soft voice and sparkling eyes, as she revealed, layer by layer, the intelligent and world-weary character Daisy is. My only surprise is that she did not run screaming from the room at every statue because Daisy is portrayed by Carey Mulligan, whom Doctor Who fans may recognize as Sally Sparrow in the infamous episode Blink, and whom everyone else will recognize as Irene in Drive. Daisy’s adultering, racist brute of a husband is played in the best portrayal I have yet to see of Tom Buchanan. His boasting, boorish manner is perfectly embraced by Joel Edgerton, the moisture farmer from Tatooine. (*cough cough Owen Lars*) However the shining performance in this film was by the man of many talents and not-so-many Oscars: Romeo Capulet (Romeo + Juliet), Jack Dawson (Titanic), Cobb (Inception), and Calvin Candie (D’jango Unchained) play the mysterious nd debonair neighbor to Nick Carraway. The titular character, Jay Gatsby, is played by Leonardo DiCaprio. I have seen a majority of DiCaprio’s films, and as far as performances go, if not his best, Jay Gatsby certainly reaches for the top of that illustrious list. DiCaprio manages to capture Gatsby in ways few actors have, bringing about the subtlety of intelligence and the desperation of years of self-delusions.
            From the spinning and colourful parties to Nick’s drab cottage to the raucous and wild speakeasies, beginning to end, West Egg to East Egg, The Great Gatsby is the best rendition of this timeless and meaningful story since Fitzgerald’s pen touched the paper 88 years ago, when the illegal booze flowed like water, and the parties twirled like a kaleidoscope of aristocratic color. What? Copy/Paste? What are you talking about?) This is a film that reaches out and grabs both those who have read the books, and the many who have never even heard of Gatsby before this very year. A fantastic movie in a year of fantastic movies to look forward too. Yet somehow I feel like the tragic fairytale that is The Great Gatsby will stand out through it all as a victory for the unconventional, and a success for the world of literature. And who knows? Maybe this movie WILL break every tradition, and Leo will get that Oscar!

NOTE: Leo did not get the Oscar

reels-and-cartridges:

            The year is 1925. The illegal booze flows like water, and the parties twirl like a kaleidoscope of aristocratic color. The stock market is doing nothing but climbing, and the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer. In this year in the United States of America a thin novel was published. A novel packed with power and symbolism and meaning and lessons and the American Dream. That novel was The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby is a novel dealing with the lofty height that is the American Dream and the corruption of wealth and prestige. This book, even today, is an applicable and relevant cultural icon of American literature that has been adapted to film on several occasions. And on May 10th at 12:00 AM, another iteration was added to that list.

            Baz Luhrmann is known for producing/directing films including Moulin Rouge and Romeo + Juliet. In only 4 feature length films, Luhrmann became known for a bizarre filming style that broke the rigid traditions of the Hollywood Cameraman. And his 5th full length film does NOT disappoint. Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby is the first reproduction for the silver screen since the famous 1974 film starring Sam Waterson. Luhrmann’s style can be described only as crazy, chintzy, glitzy, and bizarre. Yet… utterly perfect. To style it after the book and stay true to the feel and viewpoint Luhrmann keeps the concept of a third person/past-tense narration. However, while this risky gamble has ruined many a movie, several have actually pulled it off (Here’s lookin’ at you Princess Bride) The Great Gatsby managed to become one of those lucky few due to a clever, and subtle prologue. Probably the filming technique that many will find most jarring is the use of words actually appearing onscreen as spoken by the narrator. These techniques may sound odd, but they coalesce together in a production that gives The Great Gatsby a feel of a fairy tale, and after seeing this movie, I began to wonder if that isn’t what style the novel itself was meant to be all along. The soundtrack of The Great Gatsby, despite the Jazz Age being in full swing (see what I did there?? Swing is also a form of music that came about in the twenties and… okay, I’ll shut up) the majority of the music were popular modern songs by singers such as Beyonce and Carly Rae Jepsen. While I was slightly disappointed in the lack of big band jazz and swing, the slower, jazzier renditions of these popular songs even had me enraptured, tapping my fingers in time with the beat, and will help bring Fitzgerald’s world to modern audiences.

            The plot of the movie is more faithful to the book than almost any book-to-movie production I have ever seen. Minus a few small plot arcs, and the edition of a sort of tie-together prologue and epilogue, The Great Gatsby stays remarkably true to its printed parent. Taking place in the 20’s in The Big Apple, our story is narrated by Nick Carraway, a young mid-western Yale graduate who moves to New York to join the Bonds business in the biggest economic boom in the USA’s history. He moves into a forgotten groundskeeper’s cottage next to the property of a wealthy, and mysterious socialite named Jay Gatsby. As Nick observes the ethical and moral plights of his cousin Daisy and her husband Tom Buchanan, and the pro golfer Miss Jordan Baker, Nick finds himself embroiled in a confounding web of secrecy, love, deceit, and tragedy.
            The casting for this Jazz Age saga was in most ways perfect. Even the smallest of supporting roles was cast in a way that made it stand out all on its own. The narrator, Nick Carraway, is portrayed by Tobey Maguire, also known as your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man (prior to Andrew Garfield). I’ll be honest, in many previous productions, I found Tobey’s performances lacking or out of place. However, I feel he really came alive as Nick Carraway, bringing a new depth to the quiet and subtle character. Daisy Buchanan,  from the moment she peeked over the couch in the room billowing with white curtains, held me enraptured with her soft voice and sparkling eyes, as she revealed, layer by layer, the intelligent and world-weary character Daisy is. My only surprise is that she did not run screaming from the room at every statue because Daisy is portrayed by Carey Mulligan, whom Doctor Who fans may recognize as Sally Sparrow in the infamous episode Blink, and whom everyone else will recognize as Irene in Drive. Daisy’s adultering, racist brute of a husband is played in the best portrayal I have yet to see of Tom Buchanan. His boasting, boorish manner is perfectly embraced by Joel Edgerton, the moisture farmer from Tatooine. (*cough cough Owen Lars*) However the shining performance in this film was by the man of many talents and not-so-many Oscars: Romeo Capulet (Romeo + Juliet), Jack Dawson (Titanic), Cobb (Inception), and Calvin Candie (D’jango Unchained) play the mysterious nd debonair neighbor to Nick Carraway. The titular character, Jay Gatsby, is played by Leonardo DiCaprio. I have seen a majority of DiCaprio’s films, and as far as performances go, if not his best, Jay Gatsby certainly reaches for the top of that illustrious list. DiCaprio manages to capture Gatsby in ways few actors have, bringing about the subtlety of intelligence and the desperation of years of self-delusions.

            From the spinning and colourful parties to Nick’s drab cottage to the raucous and wild speakeasies, beginning to end, West Egg to East Egg, The Great Gatsby is the best rendition of this timeless and meaningful story since Fitzgerald’s pen touched the paper 88 years ago, when the illegal booze flowed like water, and the parties twirled like a kaleidoscope of aristocratic color. What? Copy/Paste? What are you talking about?) This is a film that reaches out and grabs both those who have read the books, and the many who have never even heard of Gatsby before this very year. A fantastic movie in a year of fantastic movies to look forward too. Yet somehow I feel like the tragic fairytale that is The Great Gatsby will stand out through it all as a victory for the unconventional, and a success for the world of literature. And who knows? Maybe this movie WILL break every tradition, and Leo will get that Oscar!

NOTE: Leo did not get the Oscar

Source: reels-and-cartridges
Photo

gamefreaksnz:

Mirror’s Edge 2 E3 video delves behind the scenes

DICE has delivered a new trailer offering a greater look at the upcoming Mirror’s Edge.

View the clip here.

Source: gamefreaksnz
Photo

theomeganerd:

Check out Uncharted 4 in 1080p 60FPS!

All footage you see in the trailer was captured completely in engine. That’s Nathan Drake rendered in 1080p full glory using the power of our PS4 engine. All footage you see in the trailer was captured completely in engine. We’re targeting 60fps for Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End and as you can see the visual fidelity for our character models will reach new heights. In fact, thanks to the power of the PS4, right now Drake’s Uncharted 4 model is over double the polygons of Joel from The Last of Us PS3.

The next generation of Nathan Drake will explore what it means when Drake is forced back into the world of thieves. He will embark on a globe-trotting journey in pursuit of a historical conspiracy behind a fabled pirate treasure. It’s his greatest adventure yet and will test his physical limits, his resolve, and ultimately what he’s willing to sacrifice to save the ones he loves.

Source: naughtydog.com
Photo
Video

dobuto:

tmclark91:

plantswithnopants:

one step forward, two thousand and fourteen steps back

This is the game people have been hyping about?

$68 million budget

And I’m willing to bet fucking pissbaby gamers will still allow it to make a profit

This is fucking insulting.

Big news everyone
Watchdogs sucks!

(via swarnpert)

Source: plantswithnopants
Video

popculturebrain:

Full Trailer: ‘Interstellar' - Nov 7

Written by Jonathan and Christopher Nolan, directed by Christopher Nolan, starring Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Michael Caine, Jessica Chastain, Wes Bentley, William Devane, Topher Grace, John Lithgow, Ellen Burstyn and Mackenzie Foy.

I like the idea of Nolan taking on environmentalism and space, and this feels like one of his most conventional films to date. There’s obviously something else going on here that we’re not seeing. It’s clear this is only covering the first act or part of the film.

Source: popculturebrain
Photo Set

i got time for u (◡‿◡✿): [1/10] male characters → seamus finnigan

(via mugglenet)

Source: remus-lupin
Photo Set
Super Smash Bros. Roster (4/8/2014)

(via dexysmidnightruners)

Source: cacnea
Photo

theomeganerd:

RUMOR: Next Borderlands Game is Pre-Sequel Set on The Moon for 360/PS3/PC

Borderlands is back, and this time its going to the moon with Borderlands: The Pre-sequel, a full on co-op shooter RPG set in the five year gap between Borderlands 1 & 2 for Xbox 360,PS3 and PC

We at GamePointsNow have managed to get our hands on some exclusive info regarding the next instalment in the Gearbox’s hit franchise.

Only a month ago Gearbox CEO Randy Pitchford announced that his studio were not working on a borderlands sequel but they didn’t mention that 2k Australlia were working on a Pre-Sequel.

Set on the moon of Elpis and Hyperions ominous H shaped moon base, the game sees Handsome Jack in the days when he was just a humble programmer called John, hunting a powerful alien artefact (what else!!). Players will be able to select one of Jack/Johns four lieutenants to play as in Athena The Gladiator, Wilhelm The Enforcer, Nisha The Lawbringer and Fragtrap, a militarised claptrap..

The astute amongst you may recognise some of the names from their appearances in previous instalments, Wilhelm is the half human, half Hyperion Loader boss from Borderlands 2 and Athena made an appearance in the General Knoxx DLC for the first game as a Lance Assassin gone mercenary. Nisha bears a striking resemblance to the seconds games Sheriff of Lynchwood, who was also Jacks girlfriend.

Athena will be a melee focused character able to absorb incoming fire with here kinetic shield while dispatching enemies with her plasma sword. While Wilhelm(sadly before he became a badass loader) will be able to make use of a shoulder mounter cannon and drones which you can call down to aid you in combat.

As you’d expect from any Borderland title there is the usual bazillion weapons to choose from, and with being set on a moon there’s plenty of opportunity to ramp things up a little. There are two whole new weapon types to get your teeth into this time around. Laser weapons and moons go hand in hand so you won’t be disappointed there, but the real fun looks to be in the Cryo class of guns, couple that with the games low gravity setting and it’s a case of set your phasers to fun (sorry) as you freeze and shatter your foes.

Yes Elpis has reduced gravity (it is a moon after all) so tossing bandits into orbit with a well placed grenade is a sure thing. There’s also jetpacks to help you get around the moons surface and outwit your enemies, although this does tie in with another of the games new features to present a whole new challenge for veterans of the series.

Oxygen will play a huge role in the game, in fact it’s actually going to be lootable in the form of OX -Kits.This adds a whole new layer to the combat with you requiring to manage your own oxygen levels while battling your foes, although it does lead to the option of shattering an enemies helmet to instantly deprive them of precious O2 and gain an advantage.

While there is no set release date for Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, we at Team GPN would lay our inter galactic cowboy hats on a 2014 release due to it being a 360/PS3 release.

And while this is nothing but a rumour until officially confirmed, we can say we are sure you’ll be hearing (or maybe reading) something real soon.

*drooling*

Source: gamepointsnow.com
Answer
  • Question: Hello! I don't know if someone already asked you this but, what do you think about Chrom, Robin or Lucina from Fire Emblem: Awakening getting into SBB4? Is there a possibility? Or do you think Sakurai will just bring Ike back? Awesome blog by the way! c: - aishatsukiari
  • Answer:

    smashbroslegacy:

    Thank you for the compliments on my blog, 

    I think there’s a possibility, but it’s relatively unlikely. It may look like Marth + Ike + Chrom or Marth + Robin but I can’t see a Marth + Ike + Chrom or something.

    [And Roy’s more or less out of the question…]

    I’m speculating as well, but they may replace Ike with Chrom, just as Ike replaced Roy.

Source: smashbroslegacy
Photo

hardcoregamermagazine:

Gearbox Software to Announce Next-Gen Game This Year

However, we can’t forget that the studio has another game in production; Furious 4.  Originally unveiled at E3 2011, Furious 4 was supposed to be a new entry in the Brothers in Arms franchise, but was later dropped from the franchise as it didn’t fit the tone of previous games.  The game has not been seen publicly since E3 2011, though the studio still insists it is coming.  Thus making it a prime candidate to be Gearbox Software’s next game.

Read more!

http://www.hardcoregamer.com/2014/04/02/gearbox-software-to-announce-a-next-gen-game-this-year/80311/

Source: hardcoregamermagazine
Photo

hardcoregamermagazine:

Goat Simulator Gets Beautifully Dramatic Launch Trailer

Coffee Stain Studios plays the magic comedy tune slightly differently in the official launch trailer for Goat Simulator, throwing together a piece of video shockingly similar to that of Dead Island’s original slice of advertisement. 

Take a look!

http://www.hardcoregamer.com/2014/03/26/goat-simulator-gets-beautifully-dramatic-launch-trailer/79572/

So….
Loving the parody of the Dead island Trailer
This is beautiful

Source: hardcoregamermagazine
Link